Damascus

Overview

The Ancient City of Damascus, better known as the Old City, was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1979.

If an ancient Oriental poem were transformed into a city, it would resemble Damascus. Intricate beauty, enhanced by the ravages of time; covered souks filled with every treasure imaginable; sweet shops unparalleled in the Middle East filled with pastries and candy made from apricot and pistachio; elegant old villas transformed into hotels, where fountains sparkle and flowers bloom in courtyard restaurants. The past is everywhere, reminding visitors of time gone by. The Mamluk minaret, dating back some 14 centuries, symbolizes multicultural influences that have shaped what was once the centre of early Islam. Salah el Din, Islam’s shining light, is buried there, and not far away, St. Paul was converted to Christianity. Few Middle Eastern cities are so pleasant to explore on foot. Exploring the old walled city, with its warren of narrow streets, you can see the ancient Roman columns that serve as a portal to the spice-scented souk Al Hamidiyya in the Christian quarter, where excellent local wine flows freely. When the sun goes down, the sound of laughter and music fill the night air.

Concierge recommends: Damascus
damascus concierge recommends

A Damascence Shopping Spree

A taste of Damascas

Must-See Attractions

Azem Palace
– The former residence of an Ottoman governor, a treasure of Damascene architecture.

Damascus Citadel
– Part of the Old City, the surviving structure was built by al-Adil in 1202.

Chapel of St. Paul
– Built with materials from the city gate through which Paul escaped persecution.

Umayyad Mosque
– One of the world’s most impressive mosques, built between 706 and 715.

The Wall
– One of the city’s main attractions, built during the Roman era.

For more attractions information visit Four Seasons Hotel Damascus.

Upcoming Events
Damascus Film Festival
Nov 07, 2010–Nov 13, 2010

Damascus is home every other year to this world-renowned film festival, where many independent filmmakers get the chance to screen their work to a multicultural audience.

Please login to your facebook account before comment.